Female Prisoner Scorpion 701’s Grudge Song (1972) Review: Your “Thingy” Will Get Sting

If you have been following this blog, you probably know that I enjoyed Female Prisoner Jailhouse 41 very much. Some would argue that the film is a response to the Feminist Movement, calling out all men as filthy horn dogs. Women became criminals because men have wronged them in some ways (okay maybe I am going a bit too far. The Feminist Movement is about gender equality). In contrast to Female Prisoner Jailhouse 41, this film does not condone one sex over the other. In fact, I would label this film as a parody between the battle of the sexes and with the higher authority. It clearly points out the sadistic nature of those who stand for law. Cops can be piggish and anyone who has a heart would side with Scorpion (she is also referred to Nami Matsushima in the film) played by Meiko Kaji. The plot sounds interesting doesn’t it? Actually, the film failed to deliver that message, which then made it a bit of a disaster and cringey to watch. What is the fascination with genital torture, or to put it bluntly, rape?

First off, I want to point out that I am a full grown adult woman. I don’t shy away from watching sex scenes in films. It’s like watching the birds and the bees. It’s part of nature. However, I am against bad sex. It may appeal to some folks, but having your genital burned by boiling water is just brutal. In this film, the male lead, Teruo Kudo played by Masakazu Tamura, works at the sex club. His job is to control the lighting. What’s the irony in that? He got first class seating and yet he can’t get a boner because his “thingy” is messed up; it’s all because of the cops! Kudo’s flashback shows a bunch of cops tying him down, pouring hot water on his crotch! I guess you can laugh about it, depending how sadistic you are, but it’s just not right. Thus, Kudo has a grudge against the cops for ruining his “thingy” which prompted him to help Scorpion escape from the police. Keep in mind, this woman killed eight detectives! She is very dangerous and it’s still a mystery to what really happened to her. But we can draw a conclusion based on the song in the film that she was discarded by the man she loved. The lyrics goes like this:

You are a beautiful flower. His words flatter you today. But once you are in full bloom. He’ll just toss you away. Foolish, foolish, foolish woman’s song. Her song of vengeance.

Another cringey scene that didn’t sit well with me is when Scorpion and Kudo interrogate the detective wife who happens to be pregnant. Watching a pregnant woman falling off the balcony is brutal. Okay, the detective is an a-hole, but what did the unborn child do? It’s just not right. Male cops are bad and the female cops are just as bad with their whips! It seems they look forward to punishing criminals by executing them on the gallows. On top of that, the cops have no problem raping their women! There was no good reason which led to the rape scene, unless I am missing something.

In summary, I was disappointed in this film because it didn’t have any real direction other than the fact Scorpion is a dangerous woman, and she is kind of cool. But watch out! Don’t fall for her because she will sting you! It made me wonder why do men fall for difficult women? It really is a mystery to me. Don’t want good girls because they are too boring. Well you’ll get what you deserve. Your “thingy” will get sting. Hey, I am just reiterating the film’s message, or at least what I got out of it.

Well that is it for now. It’s not a great film, but I hope you had a good laugh or learned something. I know, I sure did.

Netflix Social Dilemma Review

I spy on people and tech companies spy on me on social media. “We are all connected to each other in a circle in a hoop that never ends,” I quote from Pocahontas song Colors of the Wind. I think we are becoming very intimate. It is kind of making me blushed in fact.

I was working when I watched (more like listening to) this documentary. It was insightful and frightfully scary. The sound effects made the future felt like it’s going to be all doom and gloom run by out of control AIs. To save our sanity, we must unplug and delete our social media accounts for our mental health sake. Let’s be frank, we are accustomed to comparing each other success. It’s a real thing–even I feel shitty from time to time. I am dull. I like boring stuff. I am like an old lady because I like flowers and prefer to stay in door despite what my zodiac sign says about me. Traveling is fun but traveling in my mind is more fun. The question “what is wrong with me” pops up occasionally. But it’s just part of human nature. It’s hard to look into ourselves and accept who we are when we can’t see ourselves, we need people to validate us and that’s why social media can be so addictive and detrimental to one’s health. We are a product of our time. I know that I am addicted to my phone. Google Map app is my boyfriend. He gives me direction so I don’t get lost when I go out. When it goes missing, I feel as if one of my internal organs got ripped out from my body and I am about to bleed and die. Yeah it sounds dramatic because I can be quite dramatic.

Overall, the documentary is quite educational and I am glad I watched it, however I feel that limiting oneself from using any technology related is impossible. It is so ingrained in our society. Technology is good and bad. We become narrow minded and further away from the “truth” when what we see on a daily basis becomes our reality. This can make us feel quite isolated and lonely. Just understanding this concept makes me feel better and I hope you feel the same. Well I think I am getting used to this blogging thing. In a way, I am kind of glad I don’t have a lot of followers. My content might shift towards the audience and my own voice will die. I will leave you folks with one of my favorite songs by Depeche Mode because sometime silence is best.

For other tech films related topics, check out my review for EX-Machina.

Scum’s Wish Review: A Logically Scummy Anime

In this anime, there is no consequence to promiscuous action, which makes it so intriguing. You can explore your lusty nature with your messy emotions, especially with the confusing ones. Sometimes emotions are just too hard to describe, especially if you are a teenager who is still trying to find your identity. This show successfully take apart complex emotions and lay it out for the audience to see. It’s a pretty relaxing anime to watch, actually.

In this unrequited love story, the two protagonists Hanabi Yasuraoka and Mugi Awaya happened to be honor students who use each other to replace the person they cannot be with. They rationalize their sexual meetups by using sound logic. I guess they are just too smart to study so they have time for screwing around.  There are other characters involved in this unrequited love mess. The biggest one that stood out like a sore thumb is the female school teacher, Akane Minagawa. She puts on a nice front, but she is actually the biggest scum of them all. She enjoys stealing the affection of men from other women because it makes her feel like she is the ultimate prize. Truth is–she is just an empty blowup doll (that’s my metaphor of the day). I don’t blame audience for lacking sympathy for her, however, I must say it’s nice to see a woman take charge of her sexuality. In most cultures, it’s more acceptable for a man to cheat on his wife–he’s just a man, but it’s not okay for a woman. Would a man still love his wife if she has multiple affairs outside of marriage? I think that is her dilemma. She sleeps with men casually out of contempt. How could anyone possibly love her unconditionally? As for the rest of the characters, they are not as developed or interesting. They are very two dimensional for my liking. I almost forgot they exist, but they are in the cover–the guy in the blue shirt, the blonde girl with twintails, and the redhead lesbian. I don’t even bother learning their names.

Because this anime is so scummy and alien to me, I enjoyed it. I don’t really recommend it to teenagers though–the content might be a bit too deep for a kid to grasp. Older audience may find this enjoyable and even relaxing after a long day.

Jane Eyre BBC (1983) Review: A Romantically Crazy Love Story

After watching so many quirky Japanese shows, I decided I need a switch, so I watched Jane Eyre. In fact, I’m feeling very English. I’m anticipating for fall so I can drink hot tea, but at the same time, I’m not looking forward to the horror of what Covid-19 (the reaper) will do to more lives and the economy. All we can do is tread on until we get out of this dark period. But as an introvert, I sort of enjoy this solitude because most of my hobbies are in door. I just wish the world is not so much in chaos.

My newest obsession goes to Jane Eyre BBC series. This show is superb and romantically crazy. I felt like a little girl all over again, dreaming of Mr. Right who is fictional and who only exists in a woman’s world. The attractive man is mysteriously brooding and sullen. He is a philanthropic, but denies it by behaving coldly. His speech is harsh and short. He is demanding like a child. But underneath his gloomy visage–is a man who is afraid of abandonment. Yes, I just described the male protagonist, Edward Rochester. It must be biology because it was so easy to empathize with Jane and why she fell in love with such a man. She is direct, restless and outspoken; yet she is frail, naive and forgiving. She is realistically feminine, but strong. It was an enjoyable experience to watch Jane grow and watch the dark plot unfold. There was not one moment I find the show dull.

There are two things, however, I didn’t enjoy about the show. One, is knowing the fact Edward is old enough to be Jane’s dad. He is 20 years older than she! It’s biologically impractical to pursue someone twice your age, but most girls yearn for a father figure who will make them feel safe and wanted. Realistically, falling in love with an older man is a tragedy. He will surely die before her and leave her as a heartbroken widow. Most lovers do not survive after their significant other pass away. Unless she is an ambitious woman. Then I can see Jane remaining a widow for the rest of her life.

Another thing that disturbed me about the show is the idea of love and unity. It’s sweet to hear such talk of merging oneself with a lover–to be part of his flesh and belonging to him. It’s romantic, but eerie. Who in the world would want to fuse in with another human being like conjoined twins? The quote below sounds like a horror story!

I am my husband’s life as he is fully as mine. We are bone of each other’s bone and flesh of each other’s flesh.

Despite my pessimism towards everlasting love, I enjoyed Jane Erye very much. It is clean, romantic, dark, and innocent. Watch it if you want your heart to be captivated with beautiful dialogue. What is the harm to romanticize some love into your life? Love can feel like a scary thing especially when emotions take over.

Romance Doll Review: Love Is Remembrance

Sometimes I think the term feminism is just a Western product. Over the years, it has carried such a bad connotation. I think vocal feminists are confused these days. Just because I am on the quiet side, it doesn’t mean that I don’t believe in gender equality nor do I condone femininity. Do I have to throw away my femininity to demand equality? Objectification is cringy, no lie, but Romance Doll proves it otherwise.

My first initial impression when I found this show on Netflix, I thought uh oh, it’s sex dolls for lonely men because I heard that single men prefer 2d girls/dolls over real women these days. Real women can’t compete with timeless beauties. So I was expecting the film to be political. To the contrary, I was pleasantly surprised that the film is nothing about the politics of dolls and how it may affect society in a negative way. Instead, the film explores the meaning of love by objectifying woman in the most respectful manner. It’s oxymoron, I know.

Like most art graduates, it’s difficult to find a job that utilize one’s skills. The male protagonist Tetsuo happened to graduate from an art school specializing in sculpture. A friend recommended him a job without letting him know what it is. He later found himself employed to the industry of making sex dolls. It’s not the most prestigious job, but it’s not entirely bad as it seems. In fact, he hit the jackpot! The job not only allowed him the opportunity to meet his future wife Sonoko, but it also allowed him to hone his artistic skills in creating a breathing, realistic love doll. It is his passion that ironically made Sonoko fell in love with him. He pressed his hands on her breasts to feel the texture, claiming he was creating breasts prosthetic for medical use. You might be thinking, what a sly, unethical pervert. I thought the same. But this section of the film was well executed. There is a great amount of respect for the woman’s body. It’s almost sacred-like, which explains why Tetsuo couldn’t tell Sonoko that he creates love dolls for a living.

As they say, man falls in love with image, and woman falls in love through how she feels. Out of impulse, Testsuo and Sonoko agreed to marry. Sounds like a fairy-tale doesn’t it? But it’s far from a happy story. As time progresses, secrecy between the married couple unfolds and both learn about what it means to love and to trust. There is no such thing as a perfect marriage.

What I find so pleasing about this film is that I was not offended by the notion of love dolls and what they are used for because the film did such a great job at illustrating how it can help lonely men. Think about it, why do we hold certain objects more important than others? Why are diamonds valuable to women? In this case, Testuo creates his SONOKO love doll out of remembrance for his love towards his wife who then helps fill the void of lonely men. The doll is far from trash. She is made with love and quality.

As for my final thoughts for this film, the irony of SONOKO love doll is that she was mold after a perfect wife (caring, patient, and obliging) but she is also “nice and horny.” Sounds like a wish come true to lonely men. I am pretty sure Sonoko’s soul feels content knowing that she is helping lonely men even after she is long gone from this world. After all, human companionship is part of human survival needs.

I’m not surprised that this film was directed by a woman: Yuki Tanada. The undertone of Romance Doll is far from trashy. It is typical of a woman to hold her female kind with high regards, especially if it involves sex and her body.

Netflix Series Beastars: Is the Rabbit Really a Slut?

Disclaimer: For mature audience. Not for children. Please watch show before reading this article. This is just my interpretation of the show.

Oh my virgin mind tainted by the innocent schoolboy and schoolgirl stuffed animal-like cartoon. How did a show managed to fool me into thinking that I was watching a show about an innocent high school drama? It looks so cute and adorable, so I added the show to my watchlist on Netflix. Oh my, so naive of me!

Beastars starring a slutty rabbit, is no ordinary slut you might envisioned. She is not the scantily clad type. She is a nice girl, a flower girl–small, petite in stature; soft and sweet. The type of gal you would probably find at a church. Her name is Haru. She is so cute that if I were a guy, I would ask her to marry me. With her, I know for sure there would be guaranteed sex. Don’t rabbits love to breed?

Haru_Anime

Then we have Legoshi, the main male character who is timid and soft-spoken. To most girls, he is the ideal type of guy we want for a life partner–sensitive but strong. But underneath his polite demeanor, is a terrifying strong beast.

Legosi

To most people, I might just have described these two main characters as typical, boring and cliche which can be found in most popular literature. But that archaic, plainness character is what makes the show so powerful. It seems so innocent on the outside, but it is far from innocent. They are the well-behaved civilized citizens we often find among us in the society. Underneath the human’s politeness, is raw animal instinct. Legoshi struggles with his instinct to devour Haru while Haru uses sex as a tool to survive, fighting against her instinct to be eaten by a carnivore (if this concept sounds strange I can point you to the scenes where I came to conclude this notion. Just ask in the comment section). She knows she is a prey and he is the predator. It’s a show about the power struggle between the weak and the strong told from a food hierarchy perspective.

Ironically, what I find so fascinating about submissive Haru is that she is actually a feminist. She does not refuse her male counterparts if they want to sleep with her and even admits she might enjoy it too if they want to be rough. But there is one thing she cannot accept: she refuses to be pitied by them. There is a scene where Louis tries to give her money, but she refuses, wanting his heart instead. Does that sound kind of virtuous? Sadly, from the patriarchal perspective, it’s kind of depressing having to use sex to get around in the society safely, but it’s the only weapon she has. Think about it, Haru is a dwarf rabbit. She is small, soft and cute. She is an easy prey. Can you imagine if she rejects all the guys that approach her? The result would be harassment and worst, be killed. Her action may be frown upon in the society but she’s smart about it. Unlike her female peers, Haru pulls her own weight emotionally, turning her weakness into a strength. This is why guys tend to flock towards her. How empowering is that? What I find so enlightening about this anime is that Haru is deceptive. Think twice if you think she is weak. Unlike her female peers, she does not run from her predators or tries to turn them into her loyal pets like Juno, the ambitious gray wolf.

Juno(anime)

So I have a question to female readers: who is the real damsel in distress here? And to the male readers, do you prefer that ambitious bitch Juno, who uses manipulative tactics to tie you down? Hmm…I think I know the answer.

I find it delightful that this show brings forth the struggle between the Madonna and the whore in such a way to expose the dirtiness in human nature in a twisted way. No one is a saint undernearth the orderly, civilized society that we so hope to achieve. There is no such thing as a perfect world and there’s definitely no such thing as the good girl.

Picture credits: Haru, Legoshi, Juno.